CRA Member FoodMaven gives an insightful talk at the recent TEDxMileHigh

February 20, 2018

Why does 40% of food produced in the US get thrown away?

In this eye-opening talk, industry leader Patrick Bultema follows the food to discover why the U.S. food system is so wasteful — and offers a solution.

FoodMaven is an innovative internet marketplace and rapid logistics company bringing agility and flexibility to the U.S. food system. The company’s goal is to capture and reclaim revenues from lost food, estimated at $200 billion per year. FoodMaven sells high-quality local and oversupplied food from distributors, manufacturers and producers to restaurants and institutional buyers at about half price. With an efficient Internet marketplace, big data optimization technology, and agile logistics model, FoodMaven is good for profits, good for people and good for the planet. For more information, please visit foodmaven.co.

The Germs that Kill Your Business

February 15, 2018

By Jim Malcolm, Enviro-Master Services of Denver  | Vendor Bylines —

This headline regarding the flu is alarming:

The Flu is Killing up to 4,000 Americans a Week (Bloomberg, 2/10/18)

Additionally, hepatitis A outbreaks in Colorado are also on the rise. This begs the question: is your restaurant protected from diseases that drive away customers and reduce productivity of your workforce?

Public restrooms harbor contaminants such as e-coli, salmonella, streptococcus, influenza, and staphylococcus, and these same restrooms are the distribution centers for the flu, norovirus, and hepatitis A, if not properly sanitized. The toilet plume, which sprays from a toilet when flushed, launches airborne bacteria across the restroom up to 20 feet. Obviously, the restroom requires attention to keep businesses out of the negative headlines.

Prevent the Spread of Disease

  1. Wash hands frequently – a must for employees!
  2. Add additional hand sanitizers to your restaurant
  3. Keep surfaces and door handles disinfected – applying a germicidal sealant is best practice!
  4. Schedule seasonal deep cleanings – especially during and after flu season
  5. Spray all restroom surfaces with a hospital-grade germicide. Remember the toilet plume? Bacteria and viruses are covering every surface.
  6. Be proactive and have a plan. Don’t hesitate to enlist outside help!

Stay out of the headlines by preventing the spread of disease at your restaurant!

Enviro-Master is the #1 trusted partner for restroom health and safety, as they provide comprehensive solutions to prevent the spread of disease and control odors. (303) 895-6422

Six Steps to Effective, Compliant Hazard Communication

February 9, 2018


Inadequate, noncompliant hazard communication can lead to worker injuries, even death. OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) ensures employees’ right to know and understand the potential hazards of chemicals they work with, as well as safeguards to protect themselves.
OSHA sets forth the following six steps to effective hazard communication:

  1. Identify a point person for hazard communication — This employee is responsible for obtaining safety data sheets (SDSs), planning employee training and managing other elements of program implementation at your organization.
  2. Develop and implement the plan — Hazard communication requires a plan that explains how your organization will conduct its program. The plan should list hazardous chemicals at your worksites and specify labeling, SDSs, training and communication protocols.
  3. Label all containers — Ensure all containers in your facility are labeled. If your organization manufactures or ships chemicals, label them. Labels must include specific information set forth in the Classification and Labeling of Chemicals section below.
  4. Make SDSs available — Obtain an SDS for each hazardous chemical at your workplace, and make SDSs readily available to workers. If you make SDSs available only electronically, make sure there’s a way to provide the SDSs in the event of a power failure or emergency. If you receive chemical deliveries, suppliers should provide accompanying SDSs; if they don’t, request the SDSs.
  5. Formally educate employees — Train employees before they begin work near hazardous chemicals and when new hazards are introduced to the workplace. Conduct multilingual training to accommodate a diverse workforce, and ensure that employees understand the hazards and your organization’s protective measures and equipment.
  6. Evaluate and enhance hazard communication — Periodically evaluate, update and enhance your organization’s program, especially when new hazards are introduced. OSHA’s HCS mandates that hazard communication remains up-to-date, comprehensive and tailored to your organization.

Classification and Labeling of Chemicals

OSHA’s HCS provides classification criteria for the hazards of chemicals, as well as a standardized approach to creating SDSs and labels. Your SDSs must follow a specified 16-section format, and labels must include the following six elements:

  • A product name or identifier, such as “WD-40”
  • A signal word, such as “danger” or “warning”
  • Pictogram(s)
  • Hazard statement(s)
  • Precautionary statement(s)
  • The name, address and telephone number of the chemical manufacturer, importer or other responsible party

Resources
For more information, visit OSHA’s hazard communication webpage. Another helpful resource is the Society of Chemical Hazard Communication. Also, check out Pinnacol’s hazard communication webpages for further information and downloads of a sample written hazard communication program, training materials and more. Pinnacol offers J.J. Keller safety resources on this topic, including training videos, interactive training and safety talks. Or contact Pinnacol’s Safety On Call at safetyoncall@pinnacol.com or 303.361.4700 or 888.501.4752. Our Safety Services Team stands ready to answer questions, provide materials, and help your organization remain compliant and keep your employees safe, healthy and productive.